Submissions

 

YR is currently considering submissions for the Yellowwood Poetry Prize and Fiction for YR: 27 (Web, Summer 2018) issue.
 
General Guidelines:
We consider online submissions only, through Submittable.
There are no restrictions on what type of writing you should submit.  All submissions should include a cover letter (the shorter the better) with titles of submissions, a brief, press-ready biographical statement, and any relevant contact information. Your name and contact info should be printed on every page of your submission. YR does not accept previously published pieces. Simultaneous submissions are not only permitted but expected; please notify us immediately, though, if a piece is chosen for publication elsewhere. Response time can take up to 5 or 6 months, but is often much shorter. Please do not submit additional work until a decision has been made regarding your current submission. All rights revert to authors upon publication.

 

Poetry Guidelines:  
General Poetry submissions are closed until the Yellowwood Poetry Prize closes on May 15th.

 

Fiction Guidelines:
1 short story of traditional length (up to 5,000 words), or up to 3 pieces of shorter fiction (less than 1,000 words each).

 

submit


Barry Hannah Prize for Fiction – 2017

Yalobusha Review is thrilled to announce the winner, runners-up, and finalists for this year’s contest. We received hundreds of amazing submissions this year and we are so grateful to everyone who submitted. Our theme this year was fairytale, folklore, and myths. Each of the finalists we selected approached this theme in a different way, and each offered something new and compelling to these methods of storytelling.

 

Winner:

Our judge, Catherine Lacey, chose “Junkland.” by K.A. Rees as the winning submission. Lacey writes: “Junkland. is a piercing meditation on wreckage and ruin of all sorts— human wastefulness, bodily injury, the oppressive weight of memory. Yet its language is nimble, agile, unexpected. At the heart of this story there is a deep, alluring tension— heavy and ebullient, clear and mysterious, tender and sharp.”

 

Runners-up:

“Now You’ll Have Something to Cry About” by C.G. Thompson

“Toy Whistle” by Cezarija Abartis

 

Finalists:
“In Floating Fields” by Susan DeFreitas
“Lullaby (Dark Night)” by Jeanne Genis
“Time and Oranges” by Molly Gutman
“Ladies’ Night at the Arctic Club” by Thomas Israel Hopkins
“The Laughing Owl” by Kaely Horton
“Meat Shack” by Kate Jayroe
“Holy Ground” by Joshua Storrs

 

About the Prize

 

Beloved teacher and former director of the University of Mississippi MFA program, Barry Hannah was born in Meridian, Mississippi. He joined the UM faculty in 1982, and served as MFA director from 2001 until his death in 2010. Author of many works, including National Book Award finalist Geronimo Rex, the critically acclaimed collection Airships, and Pulitzer Prize finalist High Lonesome, Hannah received numerous awards during his career including The William Faulkner Prize and the Robert Penn Warren Lifetime Achievement Award. Known for his sharp use of language and electric energy, Hannah’s writing blends traditional genre conventions and pushes the limits of the Southern literary tradition. Named in memoriam, the Barry Hannah Prize for Fiction celebrates writing that captures the strange, surreal, absurd, and magical.

 

Submission Guidelines

 

The 2017 Barry Hannah Prize for Fiction is currently CLOSED for submissions. The contest will reopen in late 2018 at a date to be decided by the editors.

Please submit 1 short story no longer than 5,000 words.

We consider online submissions only, through Submittable.
All submissions should include a cover letter with title of submission, a brief biographical statement, and any relevant contact information. Submissions to this contest are read blind; please do not include your name anywhere on the manuscript. YR does not accept previously published pieces. Simultaneous submissions are not only permitted but expected; please notify us immediately, though, if a piece is chosen for publication elsewhere. Please do not submit additional work until a decision has been made regarding your current submission. All rights revert to authors upon publication.

 

There is no contest fee; submissions are free!

 

The winning writer receives $500 and publication in an upcoming issue. Runners-up and finalists may also be considered for publication.